Posts Tagged ‘ Daniel Klem ’

Science and other things

I am diligently working on several things for upcoming blog entries, but in the meantime here is something from Bob Blincoe, director of Frontiers Missions, about the origins of science. I strongly suggest you read it. It is kind of interesting, if you ask me!

“How and Where Science Originated” (<— Click that!)

I also attended a talk by Christopher Yuan yesterday. I will be posting some of his points here in the future (after I polish my notes a little!). Some of his points reminded me of a couple of my posts (found here and here), so you will not be reading too much that I have not said before!

Much love and blessings!

Daniel

Weekend Words & Sunday Stanzas – 08/21/2011

To go along with my guest post over at Heather Joy’s blog, GrowUp318, here are a couple poems about prayer!

These were both written in later 2000 during the Christian craze over the book “The Prayer of Jabez” by Bruce Wilkinson. The youth group in which I happened to be also did an activity in which we were instructed to put the Lord’s Prayer into our own words.

my jabez prayer

Lord
please bless me as never before
and send those who need You to me
protect me and help me
so i do not hurt others

Taken from simple words for God from a simple man of God by daniel m  klem, page 165.

my Lord’s prayer

my Father in heaven
You are the Holiest
Your Kingdom is here
where You say what happens
on earth just like in heaven
please supply me food
and forgive my sins
the same as i forgive others
and help me when tempted
keeping the devil away

Taken from simple words for God from a simple man of God by daniel m  klem, page 166.

Speaking through another …

Today marks the first time I have written a guest post for another blogger!

Heather is out on a short-term mission trip to Costa Rica this week (pray for her, her team, and the Costa Ricans!), and I am one of the people helping her out while she is gone. I know some who read my blog do not care for a few of their beliefs, but Heather is a member of the Independent Fundamentalist Baptist Church which is famous/infamous (depending on your view) of being Kings-James-Version-Only-ists. In other words, they believe only the King James Version of the Bible is the only viable and authorized version. Regardless of this, Heather is one of the most amazing young Christian women I have ever had the privilege of befriending (albeit, only online).

Not only should you go check out my guest post, but seriously consider reading more of her work. As I said, she is pretty amazing.

God bless! Catch ya later, Bill and Ted… I mean, everyone!

Daniel M. Klem

(In case you want to copy and paste the link: http://growup318.com/2011/08/17/guestpoststupidprayers/ )

Weekend Words & Sunday Stanzas – 08/14/2011

Belief and unbelief are very similar things. One can be thinking and the other thinking something different. unbelief can also be not thinking.

I am not going to get into that today! Instead, here are a couple poems along these lines …

   think

   think about God in your life

   think about Jesus the Christ

   think about how He lived

   think about how to forgive

   think about the life He spent

   think about the messages sent

do not think and you will receive

   all the thoughts that God perceives

Taken from simple words for God from a simple man of God by daniel m  klem, page 88.

do not think

do not think about that person

do not think about that diversion

do not think about that plight

do not think about that fight

do not think about that gun

    only think about God’s Son

Taken from simple words for God from a simple man of God by daniel m  klem, page 38.

Belief in Unbelief

I have discussed before about how doubt is okay in certain circumstances. I was recently reminded of this topic while listening to one of my favorite songs (Jason Gray, For the First Time Again, and today I refer to the verse mentioned in the song and will get back to this later!), and it also reminded me of a conversation I had with me own mum a few years ago.

The verse I refer to is Mark 9:24: “I do believe; help me overcome my unbelief!”

The man who said this to Jesus believed that Jesus could help, but he struggled with doubt. He just handled it in the correct manner. He asked God.

What if our doubt has to do with whether or not God is involved?

The Bible deals with this.

John, in 1 John 4:1, says “Dear Friends, do not believe every spirit, but test the spirits to see whether they are from God, because many false prophets have gone out into the world.”

Did you know we are not supposed to have a blind faith? Many in the Western Church have been raised to “just believe and not ask questions.” This verse seems to declare otherwise. (Another is 1 Thessalonians 5:21)

Some people send out and/or forward e-mails that sound very inspirational or seem to raise awareness of some injustice or cause. This is the very reason Snopes.com (atheistic, as far as I know, but still quite trustworthy if you are concerned) was founded, to discover which stories are true and false. (Something I found ironic, my mom raised me to study things, and when I e-mailed her a link to something cool she asked forgiveness for not trusting me and checking Snopes! I had already checked it myself! This is the conversation I mentioned above) It is more than okay to look into these e-mails and reports.

As we get into the presidential election, we are going to be hearing many things from the candidates and their supporters both for and against each candidate. We have seen some of these stretch the truth pretty far in the past. We should check everything we hear about a candidate before choosing what to believe about them. It is just smart and an all-around good idea. If you believe we can trust everything every politician says, you need a little more help than I can offer!

Every time we meet for church or to study the Bible or for a fellowship event (concert, Promise Keepers, Women of Faith, leadership/missionary conferences, etcetera) we should approach each teaching with sound reason and a healthy dose of skepticism. I am not saying we doubt everything that is said, nor I am saying we should discount our knowledge of what each speaker has said before. For example, if you have attended the same church with the same pastor for years with solid teaching, you should be able to trust what the pastor says this Sunday, too. However, as many of my pastor friends have said over the years, we should follow along in our Bibles with every teaching to make sure there is no mistake! This is not questioning everything that is said, rather it is confirming truth or revealing mis-truthes and mistakes.

Similarly, whenever a new teacher comes along, a new theologian theologizes, or science proclaims new evidence of something, we should test the statements and information for validity and trustworthiness both with Scripture and logic. I am sorry if your feelings are hurt, but outside of Christianity all religions do not pass most tests. Even some spheres of Christianity (The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints [Mormons], Jehovah’s Witnesses, Westboro Baptist Church, some separate congregations within mainline churches, and many others) leave Scripture and logic behind. We must be careful.

This is why doubt is a good thing. This is why we can believe in God and His Church but show signs of disbelief. My mom sometimes regrets feeling like “a Doubting Thomas,” but when we are receiving teachings from a fallen world and those who may be false prophets (which can come from other religions and secular society) it can be wise to not believe everything.

If we continually seek our Lord, it becomes easier to know when it is Him speaking and when it is not. I teach the young men I mentor (and anyone else who listens) to test everything I say. They are not to accept everything I say as truth but make their faith their own. We do not always agree on every little thing, and that is okay. It is not okay when our unbelief gets in the way of our belief in God and our ability to love Him and other people.

Have some doubt, but as I said in the posts I referenced at the beginning of this one, make sure your doubt pushes you toward God and not away.

Weekend Words & Sunday Stanzas – 08/07/2011

After looking at the “black mark” of sin, how about a different look at blackness. The inspiration of this the poem today was several of the poems I wrote before it. I have several poems (before the writing of this poem and since) which were written in the middle of the night (I do not remember waking up … if I even did!) or while sitting around and day dreaming. In other words, I do not remember writing many poems! I would wake up in the morning with a new poem in my notebook, or be going over notes I just took in class and see a new poem on the page. Crazy stuff, huh?! This poem is really about God using me (any believer, really) in ways we do not understand.

Anywho, the poem:

blackout
daniel m  klem

i blackout as the Spirit moves
i move because of Him
anything that happens later is His
only He could produce results
when i come to
the work is done and i am new
if you look at it
you only see His mighty work

in all of eternity
i could only dream of doing this alone
thank You for Your wisdom
i love you

Taken from simple words for God from a simple man of God by daniel m  klem, page 146.

Black Mark

There is the belief among most Christians that since Adam and Eve all of humanity is under the curse of sin. Many argue that it is inherited through birth. Many others argue that it comes through our own decisions in life. Many others still do not care enough or feel they are not smart enough to grasp the concept; it is enough for them to know that the Bible says we are sinful (see Psalms 14:1-3; 53:1-3; Eccles. 7:20; Romans 3:9-12) and in need of a Savior.

How could it be possible to carry forward sin?

Is it not as though God is condemning everyone for the fault of two?

Consider:

A woman does drugs for years. In a time of desperation, she has sex with a dealer to get her drugs, and this act led to pregnancy. The woman is so dependent on drugs that she continues abusing them throughout her pregnancy. Her baby is then born addicted to those drugs. The child did nothing wrong, but must suffer for the sins of the mother. It was passed along.

A man acquires AIDS through his promiscuity, but he does not realize it until he is married. He and his wife now have AIDS and then have a child. This child is also born with AIDS, again at no personal fault. It was passed along.

A single dad plays the lottery with the dream of making the life of his family better. He squanders his money on lottery tickets to the point of neglecting bills. He dies as his child comes of legal age. The child inherits the father’s debt and follows the example given and gambles to attempt to raise the money needed. The child did not create the financial mess. It was passed along … as well as the behavior that created the mess.

Is sin something that is genetically passed on? Quite frankly, I do not know. However, we can see evidence that a sinful nature is present early on in the way our children only think of themselves. Granted, they cannot help it too much. Children are born rather powerless to change their situation and require a lot of help.

A friend of mine shared a story a few years ago. His family runs a business making plastics. People have to help the system along and inspect the final product. Part of the process is to move some containers from one part of the machine to another, but they have to be careful to not touch them with their hands otherwise a black mark appears on the plastic. It is also possible that touching part of the machine that handles the plastics can cause each of the containers to get identical black marks. Another part of the process is for the inspectors to watch for damaged, misshapen, or tarnished items and pull them off the line. If they miss one, it ends up going out on the market where someone buys it, takes it home, and discovers the problem. The only way to remove the stain or fix the impurities is to go through the expensive and time-consuming process of cleaning the machine and sending the product back to be melted down, refined, and sent through the process again.

Our actions always have consequences. Sometimes they are good, and sometimes they are bad. Our ancestors took an action that they technically knew was bad. Ever since, we are all stained with a black mark. It is as though they took God’s creation, us, and handled it improperly. Their fingerprint stained us.

God, however, inspects every single one of us. He was not content to let us remain with that stain. He sent His Son to show just how rough the remaking process would be. He took the time and paid the price. His blood cleansed the dirt. Our part is to let Him work us through the furnace that removes that black mark we carry, to let Him reshape us in the image of His Son.